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Ok to fit ethernet cable over roof to back of house?

RogFranc

Registered
Hi all. I'm hoping someone can give me their opinion on the following?..
I need to get an ethernet cable from the modem in the top room at the front of my house to a room at the top of the back of the house - It's not ideal to have the cable go through the house so my idea was to get someone to drill through to the loft then over to the back room - the person I asked to do the work suggested putting the cable over the roof (it's a terrace house), along the side of the back addition, then into the back room via the window frame. I also need another ethernet cable to go into a downstairs back room, and he suggested getting a splitter box for this - the box would be attached to the outside of the wall of the back addition.
So I'm not sure if I can get a splitter box that can be fitted safely to the exterior of a house? I'm also not sure it's a good idea to have a cable go over a high pitched roof. - it could be complicated (and potentially disastrous!) to drill through ceilings to have the cable go through the loft but if done safely might be the better option?
Thanks in advance for any ideas / opinions!
 

Willo3092

VIP Member
Forum Supporter
I ran my cable into the loft and put an ethernet switch up there. Easy to distribute a wired connection to any upstairs room.
 

pieeater2015

TK Veteran
Hi all. I'm hoping someone can give me their opinion on the following?..
I need to get an ethernet cable from the modem in the top room at the front of my house to a room at the top of the back of the house - It's not ideal to have the cable go through the house so my idea was to get someone to drill through to the loft then over to the back room - the person I asked to do the work suggested putting the cable over the roof (it's a terrace house), along the side of the back addition, then into the back room via the window frame. I also need another ethernet cable to go into a downstairs back room, and he suggested getting a splitter box for this - the box would be attached to the outside of the wall of the back addition.
So I'm not sure if I can get a splitter box that can be fitted safely to the exterior of a house? I'm also not sure it's a good idea to have a cable go over a high pitched roof. - it could be complicated (and potentially disastrous!) to drill through ceilings to have the cable go through the loft but if done safely might be the better option?
Thanks in advance for any ideas / opinions!
TL-WPA4220T KIT | Powerline 600 Wi-Fi 3-pack Kit | TP-Link United Kingdom
These will use your electric circuit to send the signal to each room you plug them in at,one needs to be plugged in near the router and a ethernet cable ran from the router to the plug,Then the other ones plug into a socket in the rooms you want internet and run a ethernet cable to the device your useing.
 

RogFranc

Registered
TL-WPA4220T KIT | Powerline 600 Wi-Fi 3-pack Kit | TP-Link United Kingdom
These will use your electric circuit to send the signal to each room you plug them in at,one needs to be plugged in near the router and a ethernet cable ran from the router to the plug,Then the other ones plug into a socket in the rooms you want internet and run a ethernet cable to the device your useing.

Thanks for the tip - I thought about using this system but someone advised there's a loss of speed compared to direct ethernet connection - do you think that's true? (it's for my son's gaming and he's very picky about a laggy connection!)
 

unique

Registered
i used homeplugs for years but finally got a guy to drill through a couple of thick walls with a massive drill from a building site so i could run ethernet cables, and got full speed about 5x faster than the fastest homeplugs

i recall seeing a similar question about sky cables and one or two people mentioned it's not a good idea as cables can get damaged if they aren't secured and weather/birds etc make them move and over time they can fray/break, and also if they are stuck in tiles they could move and cause tiles to dislodge and fall, so someone could get hurt or costs there fixing the roof/tiles - so basically it wasn't recommended, and instead going into the loft and back down was the suggested method (and supposedly can be quite easy to drill a couple of holes that way
 

RogFranc

Registered
i used homeplugs for years but finally got a guy to drill through a couple of thick walls with a massive drill from a building site so i could run ethernet cables, and got full speed about 5x faster than the fastest homeplugs

i recall seeing a similar question about sky cables and one or two people mentioned it's not a good idea as cables can get damaged if they aren't secured and weather/birds etc make them move and over time they can fray/break, and also if they are stuck in tiles they could move and cause tiles to dislodge and fall, so someone could get hurt or costs there fixing the roof/tiles - so basically it wasn't recommended, and instead going into the loft and back down was the suggested method (and supposedly can be quite easy to drill a couple of holes that way

I hadn't thought about those issues with tiles etc.. - Thanks for the tip. I think I'll go back to the loft idea, or even back to plan A and trail a very long cable inside around doorways etc..
 

pupuqiop

TK Veteran
Forum Supporter
You can get flat ethernet cable that goes under your carpets, drill through the wall at skirting board height and fish through then back under the next room carpet and out wherever you need it. Going over the roof is complete overkill imo.
 

linesman66

TK Veteran
Forum Supporter
Remember if you do buy this cable and
Need to fit the rj45plugs if you have to cut
The cable You need a crimping tool and tester
Fitted the plugs myself it can be tricky enough
 

pieeater2015

TK Veteran
Thanks for the tip - I thought about using this system but someone advised there's a loss of speed compared to direct ethernet connection - do you think that's true? (it's for my son's gaming and he's very picky about a laggy connection!)
The ones above say 600 meg,The ones I have are about 50 meg and runs the Xboxone in the lads room fine.he plays fortnight,Cod etc and his Gameing Pc what's in another room and through a 4 to 1 extension lead just fine.We only have 100 meg virgin also.
 

panorama93

Registered
For WiFi Broadband I ran a broadband extension cable from the main connection on the ground floor to the middle floor (ledge over stairs) and re-located the Router centrally there to provide a good WiFi signal all over the house.
For Wired Broadband I connected a Cat6 patch cable from the Router into a used HP J9561A 1410-24G Switch (eBay £20) in a Comms Box, and via Patch Panel ran Cat6 cables under floors to MK K365DABWHI wall sockets in every room.
 
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steptoe

TK Veteran
Forum Supporter
Why is everyone using cat6,?
Cst5e is faster than anyones internet, and virtually every normal PC.
And I doubt anyone has installed cat6 to compliance either, most people don't (can't) install cat5e properly, so cat6 is just a waste of money.
 

panorama93

Registered
Why is everyone using cat6,?
Cst5e is faster than anyones internet, and virtually every normal PC.
And I doubt anyone has installed cat6 to compliance either, most people don't (can't) install cat5e properly, so cat6 is just a waste of money.
Cat 5e cable is enhanced to reduce interference so that it can reliably deliver gigabit speeds. However, Gigabit Ethernet still pushes the cable to its limits. Cat 6 cable is full-on certified to handle Gigabit speeds--it's meant to handle it and it does it the best.
How to pick the right cables for your home network
 

steptoe

TK Veteran
Forum Supporter
Cat 5e cable is enhanced to reduce interference so that it can reliably deliver gigabit speeds. However, Gigabit Ethernet still pushes the cable to its limits. Cat 6 cable is full-on certified to handle Gigabit speeds--it's meant to handle it and it does it the best.
How to pick the right cables for your home network

yes,
but do you any general personn that actually knows how to install cat6 properly.?
I don't, in fact, the amount of times I've saw cat 5/5e installed incorrectly is staggering, and cat6 is way more difficult to install properly, I've neer yet seen a cat6 DIY install done to compliance, so all the benefits of using it have been nulled bby an incorrect install.
 
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